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Pandora And T-Mobile Roll Out Reward-Based Video In Effort To Boost Engagement | Last ned pandora

Pandora And T-Mobile Roll Out Reward-Based Video In Effort To Boost Engagement

"We’re seeing that by allowing people to opt into their video ads and choose when it’s worth it for them to watch something, that intent drives truly deep engagement," says Pandora SVP Lizzie Widhelm.

Pandora’s latest attempt to battle for the engagement of people on-the-go is turning to video, where the music streaming platform is releasing its performance-based Video Plus ad format to connect brands and listeners.

The video ad product, which Pandora began testing last fall, enables brands to pay only when users watch 15 seconds of a video ad, the company said in a blog post.

The performance-based format comes as retailers and location ad platforms seek to drive engagement — and win the trust — of brands with cost-per-visit ads that promise to “guarantee” by only charging for ads that actually helped drive in-store traffic.

T-Mobile is one of the first Pandora advertisers to roll out the new video format.

In exchange for watching the Pandora video ad, listeners unlock features that are typically only available with a subscription to Pandora Plus or Pandora Premium: the ability to skip more songs and replay tracks. T-Mobile is among the initial brands adding the Video Plus into their media plans beginning today.

“We’re seeing that by allowing people to opt into their video ads and choose when it’s worth it for them to watch something, that intent drives truly deep engagement,” said Lizzie Widhelm, SVP of ad product strategy at Pandora.

Widhelm outlined how Pandora has been “training” its listeners through a few steps:

  • they have a surprise and delight moment during the times when they discover new music and listening features they love, while gaining the sense of control they want
  • they learn they can enhance their listening sessions by watching video ads
  • watching video ads becomes what they expect, and they associate those advertisers with the value they consistently bring to their listening experiences.

“Brands who spend time connecting with listeners during these surprise and delight moments are then associated with adding value to consumers’ daily lives,” Widhelm added.

In terms of the appeal to advertisers, Pandora research highlights a particularly coveted demographic that is primed to respond most strongly to this format: the majority of users who watch these ads are between the ages of 18 and 34 with listeners under the age of 24 three times more likely to opt-in.

The types of listeners opting-in to these new ads and features are some of Pandora’s most engaged – they listen 57 percent longer and “thumb” 65 percent more.

“The competition for consumer attention is only getting more intense,” said John Trimble, chief revenue officer at Pandora Brands need high-quality ad solutions that create lasting impressions and resonate with their target audiences. “Video Plus boosts brand awareness, builds loyalty, captures views and promotes deeper interactions with listeners who are significantly more likely to take action.”

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Pandora's Box

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To read the essay written for the 2006 presentation of Pandora's Box, click here.

Germany, 1929 Directed by Georg Wilhelm Pabst
Cast Louise Brooks (Lulu), Fritz Kortner (Dr. Schön), Franz Lederer (Alwa Schön, his son), Carl Goetz (Schigolch, an old man), Krafft-Raschig (Rodrigo Quast, a strongman), Alice Roberts (Countess Geschwitz), Daisy D’Ora (Dr. Schön’s fiancée), Gustav Diessl (Jack the Ripper), Michael von Newlinsky (Marquis Casti-Piani), Siegfried Arno (Stage Manager), Hans Casparius (The chef) Original Language Title Die Büchse der Pandora Production Nero-Film AG Producers Seymour Nebenzahl, George C. Horsetzky Scenario Ladislaus Vajda, adapted from two plays by Frank Wedekind Photography Günther Krampf Editor Joseph R. Fliesler Art Direction Andrei Andreiev Costumes Gottlieb Hesch
 
Presented at SFSFF 2012
Print Source
Cineteca di Bologna
 
Musical Accompaniment Matti Bye Ensemble
 
Essay by Thomas Gladysz
 
Pandora’s Box got off to a bad start. When the film premiered in Berlin in February of 1929, critics and the moviegoing public were largely dismissive of the much anticipated work. Reviews at the time were mixed, even hostile. 

Based on two plays by the acclaimed German dramatist Frank Wedekind, Pandora’s Box tells the story of Lulu, a lovely, amoral, and somewhat petulant showgirl whose behavior leads to tragic consequences.

The idea of a film had been rejected by some who claimed “Lulu is inconceivable without the words that Wedekind made her speak.” To deflect criticism, director G.W. Pabst conducted a well-publicized search for an actress who was the right type: according to one film journal, the search was a topic of considerable interest, and “Everywhere one went one heard ‘What about Lulu?’ ‘Is Lulu found yet?’” Once the part was cast, filmgoers objected to the relatively unknown Louise Brooks in the role, doubting an American actress could play what was thought to be an essentially German character.

As a psychological study, some found Pandora’s Box a disappointment, regretting Pabst’s seeming retreat from the social and political engagement of his earlier works. Critics and censors were likewise taken aback by what was then considered a frank portrayal of sexuality. Even from afar, the poet H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) writing in the English film journal Close Up, noted the controversy when she stated the film was “passed by the German censors after a stormy discussion of several hours duration.”

Pabst’s choice of Brooks was said to be a mistake, and her acting came under fire. Many German critics stated she looked attractive but appeared unconvincing. One critic even called Brooks “an inanimate dummy.” Variety’s correspondent in Germany chimed in with a critique hardly more sympathetic: “Louise Brooks, especially imported for the title role, did not pan out, due to no fault of hers. She is quite unsuited to the vamp type which was called for by the play from which the picture was made.”

Pandora’s Box played across Europe where it was similarly received and cut according to local standards. In France, for example, censors thought it indecent for a father and son to vie sexually for the same woman. Their solution was to tinker with the titles and convert Alwa (Franz Lederer) from Dr. Schön’s son to his male secretary. Other changes were made in other countries.

By the time Pandora’s Box premiered in the United States in December 1929, nearly a third of the film was reportedly missing. The 55th Street Playhouse in New York City, the small art house that debuted the film, projected a statement lamenting that the film had been censored. The theater also apologized for the “added saccharine ending” in which Lulu joins the Salvation Army.

American critics were as dismissive of the film and Brooks’s role as their European counterparts. Photoplay, one of the leading American film magazines, noted, “When the censors got through with this German-made picture featuring Louise Brooks, there was little left but a faint, musty odor.”

Quinn Martin, of the New York World, echoed the remarks of other newspaper critics when he wrote, “It does occur to me that Miss Brooks, while one of the handsomest of all the screen girls I have seen, is still one of the most eloquently terrible actresses who ever looked a camera in the eye.”

In the U.S., Pandora’s Box closed not long after it opened. By then, sound had come in and poorly reviewed silent films from abroad were little in demand. Although exhibition records of the time are incomplete, it seems the film was seldom shown in America in the years following its New York debut. One rare and telling screening took place in Newark, New Jersey, at the Little Theater, a second-run house not above showing sensational or exploitive fare. The film, then synchronized with “thrilling” sound effects and English titles, was described as “The German sensation that actually reveals most of the evils of the world” while offering “Raw reality! A bitter exposé of things you know but never discuss.” Newspaper ads for this 1931 screening warned “Adults Only.”

From there, the film fell further into obscurity. In 1943, Iris Barry, who started the Museum of Modern Art’s film department, met with Brooks, who was then living in near poverty in New York City. Barry’s opinion carried considerable weight (and did so for decades to come), and she told Brooks the museum would not acquire a copy of Pandora’s Box, as “it had no lasting value.”

Things began to change in the mid-1950s. James Card, a passionate devotee of silent movies and the founder and first curator of the Department of Film at the George Eastman House of Photography in Rochester, New York, saw Pandora’s Box at the Cinémathèque Française, which then held one of the few known copies of the film. Card was bowled over. He acquired a print from the Danish Film Museum, another holder, and returned home. Though the print was incomplete and in need of considerable work, Card showed Pandora’s Box along with Pabst’s Diary of a Lost Girl (also with Brooks) to audiences slowly catching up with—as renowned German critic Lotte Eisner put it in the 1950s—Brooks’s “miraculous” performance.

Those screenings helped stir interest in the actress and her surviving films. Over the years, Card’s championing of Pandora’s Box was joined by other film historians, curators, and critics, including Henri Langlois, Kevin Brownlow, and Kenneth Tynan. Eventually, the film’s reputation, intertwined with Brooks’s, began to grow.

In his acclaimed 1989 biography of Brooks, Barry Paris put it this way: “A case can be made that Pandora’s Box was the last of the silent films—not literally, but aesthetically. On the threshold of its premature death, the medium in Pandora achieved near perfection in form and content.”

Pandora’s Box has been screened numerous times in the years since its rediscovery, and perhaps nowhere more often than in the San Francisco Bay Area. One of those screenings was witnessed by a local music producer, David Ferguson, another by a silent film enthusiast, Angela Holm. And although the prints they saw were in need of considerable work, both were mesmerized by Brooks’s performance. Together, their efforts led to the exquisite restoration screening at this year’s festival.

Like Lulu, Pandora’s Box is a beautiful film with a troubled history. Controversial at the time of its making, criticized, censored, cut, and critically disregarded, Pabst’s 1929 film has emerged as one of the last great motion pictures of the silent era. Its restoration, and its redemption, have been decades in the making.
 
Thomas Gladysz is a Bay Area arts journalist and, since 1995, director of the Louise Brooks Society. He edited the “Louise Brooks edition” of The Diary of a Lost Girl.

 


Disney Reveals FastPass Booking Date For Pandora — The World Of ‘Avatar’

Danny Cox

On May 27, 2017, Walt Disney World will open a brand new attraction at Disney’s Animal Kingdom, and it will be called Pandora – The World of Avatar. James Cameron’s hit movie will come to life for all to see and enjoy, but there have been a few lingering questions, but now they’ve been answered. Disney has finally released the FASTPass+ booking date for the Pandora attractions, and it is coming very soon.

Disney has finally revealed that FASTPass+ reservations will become available for booking for Pandora attractions beginning on March 24, 2017. For those not familiar with the FASTPass+ reservation system, booking will begin at 7 a.m. Eastern time, and you can make them on your My Disney Experience account.

There will be two attractions in Pandora — The World of Avatar, and they are the Na’vi River Journey and Avatar Flight of Passage, which will both have FASTPass+ availability. For those wanting to book them, though, there is a bit of a catch: You can only reserve one of them with your first three advanced selections.

pandora the world of avatar fastpass booking date extra magic hours
[Image by Disney]

As always, booking will be open 60 days prior to arrival for Walt Disney World Resort hotel guests and 30 days in advance for those without a resort reservation.

There is much more coming to Disney’s Animal Kingdom, though, and it adds to the new nighttime activities made available last year. Guests love being able to see Kilimanjaro Safaris at night and the “awakening” of the Tree of Life, but Disney is going truly late-night once Pandora opens in late May.

For a limited time, there will be nightly Extra Magic Hours available for Walt Disney World Resort hotel guests that will allow them access to Pandora into the wee morning hours. Those extra hours will take place from 11 p.m. until 1 a.m. and only in Pandora — The World of Avatar for the dates of May 27 through July 4, 2017.

According to WDWNT, guests at the Swan and Dolphin resorts will be able to take part in these Extra Magic Hours even though they are operated by another company.

Guests will need to remember that valid theme park admission and a Resort ID, or a MagicBand with their reservation on it, will be required to attend. If guests do not have those things with them, they will not be able to attend the new nightly Extra Magic Hours.

pandora the world of avatar fastpass booking date extra magic hours
[Image by Disney]

As exciting as the nightly Extra Magic Hours are, the confirmed date to book FASTPass+ reservations for the new Pandora attractions is what everyone has been waiting for. Those two attractions will end up having very long lines and wait times once they open in late May which will make the FASTPass+ reservations so much more valuable.

Disney’s Animal Kingdom has had this new land in the works for years now, and anyone visiting Walt Disney World has watched its progress. Floating mountains have appeared high in the sky as the thoughts of navigating a mystical river and flying on a banshee have started appearing in everyone’s minds.

This is one of the moments that so many have been waiting for, and Disney fans will want to be up bright and early on Friday to book their FASTPasses. Sleeping in won’t help anyone as they will be booked up quickly so, be prepared and ready.

Pandora – The World of Avatar is a huge expansion for Disney’s Animal Kingdom, and the new attractions will immerse guests in a world unlike any they have ever seen before. The late Extra Magic Hours will allow Walt Disney World Resort guests to explore Animal Kingdom like never before, but there is so much more. FASTPass+ reservations for these new attractions will go quickly. Knowing the booking dates will help, but you will need to work fast.

[Featured Image by The Walt Disney Company]





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as the thoughts of navigating a mystical river and flying on a banshee have started appearing in everyone’s minds.

This is one of the moments that so many have been waiting for, and Disney fans will want to be up bright and early on Friday to book their FASTPasses. Sleeping in won’t help anyone as they will be booked up quickly so, be prepared and ready.

Pandora – The World of Avatar is a huge expansion for Disney’s Animal Kingdom, and the new attractions will immerse guests in a world unlike any they have ever seen before. The late Extra Magic Hours will allow Walt Disney World Resort guests to explore Animal Kingdom like never before, but there is so much more. FASTPass+ reservations for these new attractions will go quickly. Knowing the booking dates will help, but you will need to work fast.

[Featured Image by The Walt Disney Company]





Sign of Four
  • Silence
  • Silent Divas of the Italian Cinema
  • The Silent Enemy
  • Silent Film, Orphan Film: Saving, Studying, and Screening Neglected Cinema
  • Silly Symphonies, 1929–1935
  • The Smiling Madame Beudet
  • Snow White
  • So This is Paris
  • The Solax Films of Alice Guy Blaché
  • The Son of the Sheik
  • Song of the Fishermen
  • So's Your Old Man, 1926
  • The Soul of Youth
  • South: Sir Ernest Shackleton's Glorious Epic of the Antarctic
  • The Spanish Dancer
  • Sparrows
  • Speedy
  • A Spray of Plum Blossoms
  • Stage Struck
  • The State of Preservation, 2017
  • Steamboat Bill, Jr.
  • Stella Dallas
  • Stephen Horne: The Re-Animator
  • Strik`UUrong Man
  • The Strong Man
  • The Strongest
  • The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg
  • Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans
  • Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, 1927
  • The Swallow and the Titmouse
  • T

  • U

  • V

  • W

  • #

  • True art transcends time.


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    Pandora And T-Mobile Roll Out Reward-Based Video In Effort To Boost Engagement | Last ned pandora

    Pandora And T-Mobile Roll Out Reward-Based Video In Effort To Boost Engagement

    "We’re seeing that by allowing people to opt into their video ads and choose when it’s worth it for them to watch something, that intent drives truly deep engagement," says Pandora SVP Lizzie Widhelm.

    Pandora’s latest attempt to battle for the engagement of people on-the-go is turning to video, where the music streaming platform is releasing its performance-based Video Plus ad format to connect brands and listeners.

    The video ad product, which Pandora began testing last fall, enables brands to pay only when users watch 15 seconds of a video ad, the company said in a blog post.

    The performance-based format comes as retailers and location ad platforms seek to drive engagement — and win the trust — of brands with cost-per-visit ads that promise to “guarantee” by only charging for ads that actually helped drive in-store traffic.